X-ray services at Basingstoke hit by cyber attack

Worldwide ransomware cyberattacks What we know

Worldwide ransomware cyberattacks What we know

The healthcare system remains unusually-reliant on technology running Windows XP, an old operating system that is more vulnerable to attack than modern alternatives.

"Since the global coordinated ransomware attack on thousands of private and public sector organisations across dozens of countries on Friday, there have been no sustained new attacks of that kind".

Companies around the globe are preparing for an imminent cyber attack as the offices re-open on Monday, media reports said.

Europol said more than 200,000 computers around the world had been affected over the weekend in what it said was "an unprecedented attack". Not that ransomware attacks tend to be the subject of reporting - there is quite a high rate of payment of affected users as the pricing is deliberately cheaper than most alternatives unless your back-up process is very good.

In a statement on Twitter the trust said: " We are in a period of recovery, having come out of a major incident following the ransomware attack on Friday.

Hackers took control of computers and cut off phone lines in hospitals on Friday causing mayhem and leaving large sections of NHS services down over the weekend.

"Our priority has been to restore our radiology services, and like other Trusts affected working with NHS Digital, we will continue to do all we can to protect our systems for the future".

Cyber Security Minister Dan Tehan said on Monday that just three businesses had been hit by the bug, despite worries of widespread infection.

Specifically pointing to US intelligence agencies, Smith said the worldwide hack "provides yet another example of why the stockpiling of vulnerabilities by governments is such a problem".

The situation in Ireland is being monitored by the National Cyber Security Centre in the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment.

The latest malware, called WannaCrypt or WannaCry, is spread by taking advantage of a Windows vulnerability that Microsoft released a security patch for in March.

Problems with cyber security in the NHS was highlighted a year ago by Dame Fiona Caldicott, the national data guardian, who warned issues were given insufficient priority and that health bodies persisted in using obsolete computer systems, The Times reported.

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