Tunisia frees brother and sister of Marseille killer

Anis is also suspected of belonging to a terror organisation meaning he could provide the missing link between Ahmed and extremist groups

Anis is also suspected of belonging to a terror organisation meaning he could provide the missing link between Ahmed and extremist groups

Another brother and sister of Ahmed Hanachi have meanwhile been detained in Tunisia, authorities said Monday. He is accused of being an accessory to the murder of two French women in the southern French city of Marseille on October 1, according to the police.

Police in Italy have arrested the brother of a Tunisian man who stabbed to death two women in the French city of Marseille earlier this month.

Italian police arrested 25-year-old Tunisian Anis Hannachi in Northern Italy on Saturday evening.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack, but French investigators have not found any evidence linking it to the jihadist organisation.

The only trace of him before in the peninsula dates back to 2014, when he arrived on a boat carrying migrants and that it has been referred to directly in Tunisia, as Italy was now in the habit of doing with nearly all of the Tunisians arriving on its shores.

But for now, "we have not established any common framework of conduct that could make us think that there could be something here in Italy constituting a (logistical) base for striking elsewhere", Giannini said.

Police are now investigating Anis's possible contacts in Italy.

The investigating judge overseeing the case therefore made a decision to release them after questioning, he said.

He had no documents and claimed to be Algerian but further investigation revealed him to be the brother of the Marseille attacker, 29-year-old Ahmed Hanachi, who was shot and killed by police following the October 1 attack.

Italy's chief anti-terrorism prosecutor Franco Roberti told reporters: "Ahmed never showed any signs of radicalization in Italy".

Police in southern Switzerland have detained two Tunisian asylum-seekers on suspected links to foreign extremism.

The Marseille attacker's estranged wife told Italy's Corriere della Sera newspaper on Sunday that she did not believe Ahmed had become a radical Islamist.

He said he had heard no news from his sons in Europe for two months.

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