Facebook to show people if they fell for Russian propaganda

Facebook to create portal to help users identify Russian ads

Facebook to create portal to help users identify Russian ads

Facebook Inc. will show people which Russian propaganda pages or accounts they've followed and liked on the social network, responding to a request from USA senators to address manipulation and meddling during the 2016 presidential election. In September, Facebook agreed to give Congress copies of all of the ads that were bought by Russian groups, and last month the company pledged to be more transparent about the sources of its ads.

With examples of Russian-created Facebook pages behind him, Sen. It will answer the user question, "How can I see if I've liked or followed a Facebook page or Instagram account created by the Internet Research Agency?"

Facebook previously revealed that the Internet Research Agency ran a number of fake accounts advocating for a wide variety of causes on both sides of the political spectrum.

The web page will show only a list of accounts, not the posts or ads affiliated with them, according to a mock-up.

"It is important that people understand how foreign actors tried to sow division and mistrust using Facebook before and after the 2016 United States election", Facebook said in the post.

Jack Reed of Rhode Island and Richard Blumenthal of CT, as well as Rep. Teri Sewell of Alabama - had pushed Facebook to find a way alert its users about their exposure to Russian disinformation.

Facebook's new tool for viewing propaganda ads is the latest salvo in a damage-control campaign by the company that kicked into high gear last month, when they were caught redacting references to Russian Federation from an April report on the way its platform was manipulated during the election.

However, not all of those users will be able to take advantage of the portal. A user will only see what they liked or followed, so if they simply saw IRA content in their news feeds, they won't be notified.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, called the announcement "a very positive step" in the wake of multiple tense hearings on Capitol Hill where lawyers from Facebook, Twitter, and Google were grilled about their role influencing the 2016 election.

The tool will arrive at the end of the month, displaying Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency pages and whether or not users have been following them.

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