Latest Raspberry Pi 3 computer board now available from RS Components

The new Raspberry Pi has 5 GHz Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2

The new Raspberry Pi has 5 GHz Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2

Further, for users who prefer wired to wireless, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is integrated with an upgraded LAN chip from Microchip.

Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ now supports Power over Ethernet (PoE), with a PoE HAT capable of providing the necessary 5V of power set to arrive in the near future. It is not gigabit, but it should peak at 37.5MB/s so is more than enough to handle any 1080P file, and quite possibly the CPU should handle 4K media playback.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation today announced a new version of its flagship low-priced board computer called the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. It is available immediately. And similar to the Pi 3 Model B, it costs $35 - while the previous model is now on sale for $5 less through some outlets. The revised processor carries model number BCM2837B0 and has a metallic heat spreader to improve thermal performance. It also sells smaller, less powerful products like the Raspberry Pi 1B+ ($25) and 2B ($35), plus the entry-level Raspberry Pi 1A+ ($20) and various Compute Module models.

The other main boons come on the networking front, with a Cypress CYW43455 chip providing dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi (whereas only 802.11n was supported in the original Pi 3) and Bluetooth 4.2 (a step up from the previous Bluetooth 4.1). The Raspberry Pi Foundation will be submitting the application to ICASA and approval is expected around May/June.

The board also offers improved communications performance via Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0, delivering a maximum throughput of 300Mbps through the board's four USB 2.0 ports; as well as retaining the extensive 40-pin GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) header connector. It's a good thing though as it will work well with the existing Pi cases and accessories. There are no plans to discount older models or cease production until there's a clear sign demand is drying up. Another bonus is the board's co-creator Eben Upton says that the processor should be less likely to throttle its performance under heavy load-thanks to a heatspreader on top of the CPU.

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