Ajit Pai says you’re going to love the death of net neutrality

Net neutrality ends this Monday June 11th motion to keep it alive could die in the House

Net neutrality ends this Monday June 11th motion to keep it alive could die in the House

Opinion polls show overwhelming public support for the net neutrality rules.

A new set of rules at the Federal Communications Commission went into effect Monday, ending consumer protections that assure equal legal broadband access that doesn't slow or block certain sources. Those rules required online service providers to treat all internet traffic the same without slowing or blocking content from competing providers.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has said the agency under Obama overstepped its authority when it imposed the 2015 regulations. On Thursday, with the official repeal date looming, dozens of senators sent a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan urging him to schedule a vote on the issue. The FCC voted to repeal those protections in December saying that the rules were too heavy handed. Supporters of net neutrality have also said that without regulation, a greater socio-economic digital divide could develop, creating a class of information "haves" and "have nots".

"Monday, we are ending this flawed approach and allowing smaller internet service providers to focus their efforts on deploying more broadband, connecting more Americans with digital opportunity, and offering more competition in the marketplace", Pai wrote in a column for CNET published Sunday.

While it's unclear what the repeal will look like for consumers in the United States, advocacy group Free Press has cited numerous examples of behaviors pre-dating net neutrality laws in advocating against the repeal. The idea was to keep the internet open and uncensored. As we pointed out at the time of the Senate vote, the CRA now has to pass the House where the Democrats that support the Act are greatly outnumbered. "And in the medium- to long-term, I think we're going to see more investment in high-speed networks, particularly in rural areas that are hard to serve".

The revised rules were a win for ISPs, whose practices faced significant government oversight and FCC investigations under the 2015 order.

Net neutrality looks set to live on in piecemeal form as some USA states are enacting legislation that will require telecoms companies operating in their territories to abide by similar laws. The idea was that all Internet traffic should be treated equally by broadband providers. Per the net neutrality order, states can not enact any legislation that attempts to circumvent the repeal.

Pai has said he agrees with the concept of a "free and open" internet, but disagrees that regulating the service like phone networks is the best way to achieve that goal.

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