Parents wait to hug sons as details of risky Thai rescue emerge

Some of the boys rescued from a Thai cave seen in hospital in Chiang Rai

Some of the boys rescued from a Thai cave seen in hospital in Chiang Rai

MAE SAI, Thailand As ecstatic relatives watched and waved from behind a glass barrier, the 12 boys and their soccer coach rescued from deep within a flooded cave in Thailand made the V-for-Victory sign today from their beds in a hospital isolation ward where they are recovering from the 18-day ordeal. The final five victims were rescued on July 10, the Bangkok Post reported, after divers first discovered them on July 2.

Angle warned that if the boys continue to be defined as the kids who were rescued from the cave, it could become the singular characteristic of their identities.

This will be the second time that Ivanhoe Pictures and Jon M. Chu will be teaming up as their first collaboration, Crazy Rich Asians, will be arriving in theaters on August 15.

It also involved about 90 divers in all, 50 of them from overseas, as well as medics, ambulance drivers, and helicopter pilots to take the boys straight to hospital in the town of Chiang Rai.

The extraordinary operation to save the boys came to an end on Tuesday, when the Thai Navy SEAL rescuers and a doctor followed the last four boys and their coach out of the cave complex.

"They thought they'd only be an hour", Banpot Korncam, father of the 13-year-old captain of the "Wild Boars" team, told media. "We couldn't cope and we were adults", Urzua told Reuters.

She added: "I'd like to thank everybody for all their teamwork to get the lads out, it is absolutely lovely".

Thongchai Lertwilairattanapong, a health department inspector, earlier told reporters one from the last group rescued on Tuesday had a lung infection and they were all given vaccinations for rabies and tetanus.

But he said: "The most important thing to have was a full face mask which had been applied inside with positive pressure to enable them to breathe and to be relaxed enough so not to feel any anxiety during the process". A former Thai navy SEAL diver died during the mission.

Another diver, Jason Mallinson, 50, from Huddersfield, said the team left messages for the children as they flew back to the United Kingdom saying: "We're very glad we could get you out alive". The boys were put in green plastic toboggans and carried through: at some points, there were steep slopes with cascading waters and the rescuers had to use a pulley system to winch them up.

Cylinders placed at locations throughout the cave for replenishing the boys' air supply were "jammed" with 80 percent oxygen instead of regular air because "that would plus up their oxygen saturation levels and that would be really good for them, their mental state", he said. All were improving quickly, the country's top public health official had said.

Isn't that wonderful? The Thai rescue mission has taught us one thing.

"The world just needs to know that what was accomplished was a once in a lifetime rescue that I think has never been done before", Anderson said.

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