Kavanaugh sworn in again during ceremonial event at White House

Trump decries calls to impeach Kavanaugh as an ‘insult to American public’

Trump decries calls to impeach Kavanaugh as an ‘insult to American public’

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks during his ceremonial public swearing-in, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018.

Kavanaugh was confirmed by a razor-thin 50-48 majority in the U.S. Senate following accusations of sexual misconduct, including one of sexual assault as a high-schooler, that he emphatically denied.

Nadler called the FBI investigation into the allegations against Kavanaugh - which only lasted a week and was limited in scope - a "whitewash" investigation, according to the New York Times.

At a White House ceremony on Monday night, Mr Kavanaugh said he was starting his new job without bitterness.

Trump used his introduction of Kavanaugh to slam the judge's opponents.

He tried to distinguish between President Donald Trump's nomination of Kavanaugh this year and his own decision not to have the GOP-run Senate consider President Barack Obama's high court nominee, Merrick Garland, in 2016.

After Judge Kavanaugh had placed his hand on a bible and sworn to perform his duties to the best of his ability, President Trump said: "On behalf of our nation I want to apologise to Brett and the entire Kavanaugh family for the bad pain and suffering you have been forced to endure".

He said that "under historic scrutiny", Kavanaugh was "proven innocent".

Kavanaugh's wife and two daughters were in seats reserved for justices' guests, along with retired Justice Anthony Kennedy.

CNN legal analyst Joan Biskupic said Brett Kavanaugh would be "changing the law of the land" for the next 20 years as the newest Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.

But after being sworn in, Kavanaugh struck a markedly more conciliatory tone.

Protesters crowded hallways in the Capitol before Kavanaugh's confirmation vote and pounded on the Supreme Court doors afterward.

Kavanaugh, 53, began work immediately after his official swearing-in on Saturday evening even as protesters stormed the front steps of the Supreme Court and pounded on the 13-ton bronze doors, furious that he had been confirmed despite a decades-old allegation of sexual assault brought by Christine Blasey Ford.

Republicans had hoped to confirm Kavanaugh in time for the court's October 1 start of the new term. Some Democrats have talked of impeaching Kavanaugh, though the process is hard with a two-thirds Senate majority required to remove a federal judge.

'This has been a shot in the arm for us going into the fall election, ' he told reporters in Louisville on Monday of Kavanaugh's confirmation. "It is not a partisan or political institution", Kavanaugh said. Fifty-two percent said they believed the women versus 38 percent who said found Kavanaugh most credible. The new justice's four clerks all are women, the first time that has happened.

They held up signs that said, "We do not consent", "We will not yield", and "You failed your mom".

This is all just hypothetical at this point, but McConnell would be in a different position than Biden was in 1992, or Schumer was in 2007, or McConnell himself was in 2016, since Republicans would control the Senate and the White House.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.