Man's doorstop turns out to be meteorite worth $100K

Central Michigan University geology professor Mona Sibescu said that of all her time at the university, this is the first "rock" she's tested that actually turned out to be a meteorite.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically "no" - meteor wrongs, not meteorites", she said with a smile.

"I could tell right away that this was something special", Sirbescu said Wednesday in a statement.

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", Sirbescu said in a press statement from the university.

A USA professor has established a rock used as a doorstop is actually a meteorite worth thousands of dollars.

It's a story that began out of this world almost a hundred years ago when a meteorite crashed down to earth near Edmore, Michigan.

But the "neat" rock that David Mazurek kept at his home in Grand Rapids, Michigan was not just any old paperweight. The farmer told Mazurek that he and his father watched the chunk of rock slam into their property one night and picked it up the next day, when it was still warm to the touch.

Upon receiving the meteorite, Sirbescu evaluated it and discovered it was an iron-nickel meteorite, composed of 8 to 8.5 percent iron and 11.5 percent nickel.

For the past thirty years, he has used it as a doorstop and sent it off to school with his children for show-and-tell.

She determined that it was in fact a 22-plus pound meteorite, making it the sixth-largest recorded find in MI - and potentially worth $100,000. The former owner told him it was a meteorite that landed on the property in the 1930s.

The man reportedly hasn't figured out exactly where the meteorite will end up, but a number of institutions are apparently considering purchasing it from him for display.

Researchers discovered the meteorite has rare metals. It will be used as funding for students of earth and atmospheric sciences.

"A piece of the early solar system literally fell into our hands", Dr Sirbescu said in a video made by the university to promote its discovery.

Now the Smithsonian museum is considering buying the space rock, and it could fetch as much as $100,000, the release says.

Mazurek says that when he sells the meteorite, he'll donate some of the money to the university.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.