Healthcare Facility Chief Quits After Woman in Coma Gives Birth

Coma Patient in Phoenix Health Facility Gives Birth to Baby Boy

Coma Patient in Phoenix Health Facility Gives Birth to Baby Boy

A woman who has been kept in a vegetative state for a decade at the Phoenix Hacienda HealthCare facility gave birth to a baby boy just days after Christmas, and now police are investigating for sexual assault.

The Arizona Department of Economic Security says in an emailed statement that it had sent a team to check on the health and safety of every person in the facility since the pregnancy and birth were reported, and that it was working with Phoenix police on their investigation. For example, an investigation in 2013 found that a staff member had made "inappropriate, sexual statements" about four clients.

Tribal chairman Terry Rambler said he was "deeply shocked and horrified at the treatment of one of our members".

"When you have a loved one committed to palliative care, when they are most vulnerable and dependent upon others, you trust their caretakers", he said.

She said no one reported that incident exclusively out of fear, and she believes there's been other abuse throughout the years.

Hacienda has been under intense scrutiny since the 29-year-old Native American woman had the healthy baby boy December 29, the station said.

Sex abuse investigation underway after a patient in vegetative state for almost a decade gives birth.

The birth triggered a police investigation and reviews by state agencies.

The Hacienda facility serves infants, children and young adults who are "medically fragile" or have developmental disabilities, according to its website.

In a statement to CBS, Hacienda Board Executive Vice President Gary Orman vowed that Hacienda "will accept nothing less than a full accounting of this absolutely horrifying situation, an unprecedented case that has devastated everyone involved, from the victim and her family to Hacienda staff at every level of our organization".

A spokesman for Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R) called the recent report "deeply troubling" in a statement to The Washington Post. Most involve fire drill and evacuation preparation or Medicaid eligibility. That employee was later fired.

The firm, which says it is cooperating with police, provides services ranging from day programs to long-term residential care for more than 2,500 patients annually.

"There's a lot of information we do not have, but things like this don't happen without someone either knowing about it or should have known about it", Solomon said.

"Federal and state laws guarantee certain basic rights to all residents of this facility and they include the right to a dignified existence and to be treated with dignity", a report issued at the time read. "I haven't been able to sleep good at night because of what occurred here", another mother, Angela Gomez said.

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